About The Book
About The Book
About The Author
About The Author
Preview The Book
Preview The Book
Buy The Book
Buy The Book

About The Book

The music never died. Writer Maury Dean shows that Buddy Holly and the Crickets are the most important rock-band pioneers of all time. Holly's Crickets invented the Beatles, Bob Dylan, and the whole concept of a rock and roll band. This'll Be the Day is foremost a love story between Texan singer/songwriter Holly and his bride Maria Elena. From a whirlwind 1¼-year career that spun his Crickets' crew to the top of the charts, to a passionate half-year courtship and marriage to Maria, the short life of Buddy Holly might not be the most important story in rock and roll. Then again, it may! “American Pie” is our nation's 2nd-favorite hit of all time. Bemoaning the “Day the Music Died”, Don's great song is dedicated to Buddy Holly.

So is Maury Dean. This'll Be the Day mostly features Holly's life. It also celebrates McLean's beautiful melody and chorus, but disagrees that Buddy's February 3, 1959 plane crash caused the music to die. Millions of musical echoes, from Bob Dylan to the Beatles and Eagles and Beyonce, prove that beyond the aftermath of Buddy's meteoric career, his music and spirit still live.

For a rock icon, Holly was no shallow silver-screen hotshot. A family man and great pal, Buddy actually proposed to the love of his life on the day of their first date. He is the most important singer-songwriter of the 50s, and the inventor of the rock and roll band as we know it. His Crickets drummer Jerry Allison was voted by Rolling Stone magazine #3 of all time behind The Who's Keith Moon and Led Zeppelin's John 'Bonzo' Bonham. The early exits of these two great drummers grant Allison the gold medal by default. Buddy's 1957-58 bassist Joe B. Mauldin was the first to popularize the ELECTRIC bass in a modern rock band. Buddy's 1959 '2nd-bass' man Waylon Jennings is currently the 4th-favorite country singer of all time, behind Johnny Cash, 1st Hank Williams Sr., and Eddy Arnold. With the physique of Abe Lincoln, the ringing Fender Stratocaster guitar later copied by Jimi Hendrix, and a friendly smile bigger than his Texas Panhandle, Baptist Buddy Holly's Crickets inspired the Fab Four, Rolling Stones, and myriads of American bands. He brought us happy songs as big as the planet, like “Peggy Sue,” “Oh Boy,” “That'll Be the Day,” and “Not Fade Away.” Buddy's echo rocks on.

About The Author

Maury Dean

Maury Dean

Dean's book is 90% Holly's life and times, and 10% memoir. The kid (Dean) grew up idolizing Holly and his sound, and fronted bands using Holly's rockin' style and rhythmic thunder and fiery guitar. Dean's bands at Michigan State University morphed into a modest #95 hit, while he plugged away at becoming one of the first Professors of Rock and Roll and wrote the first rock history—1966's The Rock Revolution, an artifact found in Cleveland's Rock Hall of Fame. Dean also wrote songs for Soul empire Motown Records, and became vice-president of Detroit Soul recording studio Big Mack. This'll Be the Day also traces the origin of the Rock Hall of Fame, and reveals the semi-secret inventor of the electric guitar. It shows how Holly's timeless sound went on to create the Beatles and Dylan, and influence literally billions of rock fans across the globe.

Dean earned a Hopwood Fiction Award and doctorate at University of Michigan. He wrote two Rock Hall of Fame books in staggeringly different epochs—The Rock Revolution (Edmore), and Rock 'n' Roll Gold Rush—originally by Maxwell Hunter (2002). 'Gold Rush' is now handled by New York City's Riverside Drive publishers Algora (2003). The Rock Revolution is a collector's item, but 'Gold Rush' is available on amazon.com. World-class DJ Bob Shannon of the #1 U.S. Oldies station WCBS-FM New York City gave Gold Rush a glowing five-star website review. Dean's been teaching History of Rock and Roll and related courses to over 10,000 college level students. You may be one of them, and who knows? Your name, or donated photos, may already be in This'll Be the Day. Marathoner Dean began teaching in 1969. He's into his 5th decade as a rock prof. Buddy Holly has always been his favorite rock pioneer. This'll Be the Day goes beyond the complete focus on Buddy's life, as done by excellent Buddy biographers like John Goldrosen, Bill Griggs, or Phil Norman. This'll Be the Day shares tremendous stories of hundreds of rising rock stars who visualized Buddy as their role model, their leader, their brother, their friend—even though they may never have actually met him.

If you are meeting Buddy Holly for the first time here, welcome to a wonderful fandom. He was a nice guy who finished first. We all applaud his monumental contributions to the music powering our greatest three generations. Buddy was known for his trademark Fender Stratocaster guitar, and his super glottal-stop vocal 'Holly hiccup.' There's some truth to the bouncy rumor that anyone who ever emulated Buddy Holly, and hiccupped in a song, is featured in This'll Be the Day.

If you want to understand the true origin of modern-day rock music, via the tall Texan who invented the rock band, Buddy is your man, his Crickets are your songster pioneers, and This'll Be the Day is your story.

Rock on.

Purchase This’ll Be The Day

Contact:

Maxwell Hunter Publishing
PO Box 9
Blue Point, NY 11715
e-mail: sales@maxwellhunterpublishing.com

Current price $19.95
Shipping & Handling $5.05
TOTAL $25.00
(NY residents add $1.75 sales tax)

Thank you, and happy Holly-days.